Youth Prevention

This is (Not) About Drugs
Prescription Opioid and Heroin Prevention Educational Program

The “This is (Not) About Drugs” educational program is designed for students grades 6-12th as an effective lesson for helping raise awareness to the risks of misusing prescription opioids. How misusing prescription opioids can lead to addiction, heroin use and overdose. The lesson encourages students to make good choices and provides the student with skills to combat peer pressure, gain support, and resources for making decisions about their own body and health. ​

​An Educational Program Designed to Specifically Address the Opioid Health Crisis

A ONE-OF-A-KIND prevention program. Available to deploy now. Communities and States can IMMEDIATELY address the risks of and reduce the rates of youth opioid abuse / misuse through the Overdose Lifeline prevention education program.

The “This is (Not) About Drugs” educational program is designed for students grades 6-12th as an effective lesson for helping raise awareness to the risks of misusing prescription opioids. How misusing prescription opioids can lead to addiction, heroin use and overdose. The lesson encourages students to make good choices and provides the student with skills to combat peer pressure, gain support, and resources for making decisions about their own body and health.

150+ Delivery Partners – 15 U.S. States and Growing

​The program has 150+ delivery partners and has reached more than 24,000 students in the state of Indiana and communities in CA, GA, IL, KY, MA, MD, MI, MS, NV, OH, PA, TN, VA, and WI.  Within Indiana, funding for this program is provided, in part, by the Anthem Foundation, the Indiana Department of Education, the Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction, and IU Health.

This video is a sample of the Youth Prevention Program that can be presented at any school in Nevada.

The “This is (Not) About Drugs” prevention program is an outcomes-driven, science-based youth opioid misuse prevention program – incorporating the NIDA principles, risk and protective factors – that can be rolled out anywhere in the United States.

  • Specifically addresses the national opioid public health crisis
  • Complements substance-abuse prevention programs such as Botvin LifeSkills and Too Good For Drugs
  • ​Targets students grades 6 – 12,  with ability to prioritize transitional years
  • Pre- and post-assessment incorporated into the program design
  • Classroom setting is recommended, over convocation
  • Built for 45-minute time block, can expand for longer time periods
  • Undergoing third-party evidence-based study for SAMHSA NREPP review/accreditation
  • Presenter training and support for deploying the program within your community or state
  • Available for licensing
  • Companion Parent Program
Interested? Contact BubHugs.org in partnership with Overdose-Lifeline.org | bubhugs@gmail.com

​”This lesson is something every school should consider to educate students about the dangers of opioids and how this epidemic is impacting individuals and communities across the country. It’s a relief knowing my students have this information and are able to make better decisions regarding their personal health and well-being.”  – Justin Petty, Teacher, Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School​

“The overall quality and content of this presentation is an excellent tool to raise awareness of teens and drug use, specifically prescription drug use, misuse, and abuse. Every teenager should be educated on this topic, & this presentation is an excellent method of delivering this information.” — Brad Short, Teacher, Convington Community High School

Student Worksheet Data

​Before,
ONLY 9% Strongly Agree that Pain Pills and Heroin are the Same Drug. After, 58% Strongly Agree – a
49% INCREASE.

After,
​76% Understand an Overdose Can Happen with the 1st, 2nd, 3rd Use – a 23% INCREASE of Student’s Knowledge.

​After,
​71% Strongly Agree/Agree That They are MORE Likely Now to Talk to Someone and Get Help.

After,
​59% Strongly Agree, the Younger Someone Starts Drinking
Alcohol or Using Drugs INCREASES the Risk of Addiction – a 17%
INCREASE of Student’s Knowledge.

After, 78% Strongly Agree/Agree That They are Less Likely Now to Misuse Prescription Pain Pills.
​87% Rate the Lesson as Excellent/ Good

20% of the Students Know Someone Misusing Pain
Medicine. 16% – Preferred Not to Say.

After, 61% Strongly Agree Pain Pill Misuse is as RISKY as Heroin – a 32% INCREASE of Student’s Knowledge.
After, 81% Strongly Agree/Agree that Alcohol, Marijuana or Other Drugs Increases the Likelihood that Someone Would Use Heroin – a 29% INCREASE of Students Knowledge.

Source: Calendar Year 2017 Student Worksheet Data

Learning Outcomes

The “This is (Not) About Drugs” opioid educational program incorporates a peer-to-peer approach and use of personal stories to:

  • Raise awareness to the risks of misusing prescription opioids
  • Explain how misusing prescription opioids can lead to addiction, heroin use and overdose
  • Encourage students to make good choices
  • Provides the student with skills to combat peer pressure, gain support, and resources for making decisions about their own body and health.

Program Design and Materials

The program follows an efficacy-based model of design and continuous measurement and improvement.  Program materials remain relevant to current conditions and ongoing feedback from schools/educators, students and presenters is reviewed to allow for versioning and updates to the program.

The lesson plan and materials are designed to provide the student with the opportunity to learn through a guided and practical exercise — deepening their understanding and retention. The program elements include:

Pre-assessment – The student worksheet* ”Before the Lesson” activity captures the student’s established perception and opinion. The worksheet statements model the lesson outcomes/objectives, using terminology from the film to help with the students retention and acquisition of the information.

​Film & Discussion – The lesson outcomes/objectives are the blueprint of the film which finds students talking to students in real, everyday terms. The discussion portion of the lesson allows for students to express their opinion about what they just watched and the presenter to guide the discussion, supported by the worksheet statements and lesson PowerPoint.

Post-assessment – The student worksheet* ”After the Lesson” activity asks the student to reassess the same six statements after they have benefited from the film and the discussion and complete some additional questions measuring remaining learning objectives.

After the Lesson Support – A takeaway flyer and website containing the video, more information, and resources supports the student after the lesson.
analytics_orig

Science-Based Measurement and Results – The completed student worksheets and the Educator “After the Lesson” feedback survey data helps Overdose Lifeline and Partner Organizations track and measure the effectiveness of the lesson plan and educational materials and improve upon the program.​

Efficacy / Study

The “This is (Not) About Drugs” educational program is undergoing third-party evidence-based study with Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis for SAMHSA NREPP submission for accreditation. In the interim the student worksheet data analysis shows program produced significant attitudinal changes in the student audience.

​Summary:
246 students were given the pre-test prior to the training and were again measured using the same test after receiving the training (post-test).  For the pre-test a mean score of 15.5 was found and for the post-test a mean score of 21.4 was found, indicating an average improvement in the scoring of 5.9.

Detailed student worksheet analysis and evidence-based review outline is available upon request – education@overdose-lifeline.org

Educator Feedback

​”The overall quality and content of this presentation is an excellent tool to raise awareness of teens and drug use, specifically prescription drug use, misuse, and abuse. Every teenager should be educated on this topic, & this presentation is an excellent method of delivering this information.” — Brad Short, Teacher, Convington Community High School

“South Vermillion High School Principal Don Harman believes the work of Overdose Lifeline is vital. “I would encourage every high school principal to contact them and have them speak to your student body. To me, that right there – every high school and I hate to say this, some middle schools – that message needs to get out there.”

“Students of today need real life examples and connections to peak their interest. This program does just that.” — Kris Sims, Teacher, Ben Davis Ninth Grade Center, Indiana

“Overdose Lifeline is a great organization to have come to your school. Our students learned a lot about the dangers of prescription pain medication and heroin! I would love to have them back in a couple of years when we have new students.” Lynn Werckenthien, SADD Supervisor, Sheridan High School, Indiana

“I’m a very ‘nontraditional’ teacher that focuses on LIFE LESSONS! I liked that the lesson was very linear with both academic terms/definitions as well as a very real feel with personal anecdotal stories.” — Don Darda, Teacher, Eastern Pulaski Community High School ​

“A must see. Kids need to know the information and how to ask for help.” — Linda Niewedde, Teacher, Irvington Preparatory Academy, Indiana

​“The best kind of drug case is the case that we don’t have because somebody makes the choice to not use. And if people, young people especially, that may not have had a lot of information about narcotics – specifically heroin and addiction – if they have more information, then it will increase the possibility that they’re going to make good decisions, not bad decisions.”
— Brent Eaton, Hancock County Prosecutor

“Indiana Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) sees the unique value in this educational program, as Overdose Lifeline works with law enforcement to deliver a message that must be shared with young people in the Indianapolis area. Programs like this have great potential to create positive change in our communities.”
— Jamie Vickery, State Coordinator Indiana SADD

​”I appreciate Overdose Lifeline, Inc. for coming out to our high school to present this lesson on heroin prevention. Heroin use has become an epidemic in our state and it’s vital that our young people become aware of what could potentially happen to them if they experiment with heroin or opioids.” — Jeff Wright, Teacher, New Palestine High School, Indiana

Student Feedback: “What is something that you learned?”

​“I learned that drugs can really mess up someone’s life. More than anyone thinks in the first place, but listening to someone describe how hard it was to get through hit me in ways that are indescribable.”

“Prescription drugs and heroin are the same type of drug and are equally dangerous. Both are opioids, and both have the potential to end your life.”

“I learned that no matter how confidant you are that you won’t get addicted to a drug after taking one dose, you can easily come addicted and it’s not within your control. Even trying drugs that aren’t as powerful, will lead to more dangerous drugs that can severely affect your life.”

“That practically any drug out there could really screw up your plans for life. If I want to do big things, I can’t let something stupid like a little pill effect my grades, my goals, and my friendships/relationships. “

“I learned that people normally do other drugs before doing heroin or prescription pain medicine. It is sort of like a ladder.”

“Don’t do any kind of drugs because you will probably end up somewhere where you never thought you would be.”

“I learned that drugs are never the right path to go down and that you should always stay away from them. Always keep good positive people in your life to make you a better person so you don’t go down the wrong path.”

Copyright 2015 Overdose Lifeline, Inc. The “This is (Not) About Drugs” Prescription Pain Medicine (Opioids) and Heroin Prevention Education program and its materials may not be reproduced or distributed without the specific, written authorization from Overdose Lifeline and completion of the required program training. All rights reserved.

​*The Overdose Lifeline educational programs’ Student Worksheet is modeled on the Meth Prevention Lesson by the Meth Project which is licensed under a Creative Commons License under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/. Based on a work at www.MethProject.org.